A Well-come Change: The Well Toronto

With more facets than the Ontario Place Cinesphere, our assignment for Allied Properties REIT’s The Well had a bit of everything. On the interactive front, we needed to create a sales application that integrated a scale model (wired up with over 3500 LEDs!), a 12’ x 7’ media wall and a tablet controller into a cohesive presentation that explores the building and neighbourhood via an intuitive interface: parks, transit, restaurants and building features all light up on the scale model, while simultaneously viewers are treated to stunning 4K images and video.

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That’s a lot of moving parts, and you might say that designstor’s role was analogous to the steel-aluminum alloy framework that brings shape to the hundreds of individual triangles making up Toronto’s waterfront triodetic wonder. Together with Gensler, Hariri Pontarini ArchitectsPeter McCann Architectural Models, 1188 and Cloud 9 AV, we were the binding force that gave form to all the disparate sources, molding them into a coherent whole.

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Nowhere was this more apparent than in the production of the “Day in the Life” video, where designstor pulled off a technical and managerial miracle, namely making a full-fledged animation out of a variety of still assets provided by several different teams. Through the magic of projection mapping, parallax, time-lapse skies and controlled camera motion, all this disparate source material was synthesized into a full motion short that focused on a day in the life of people working in the commercial portions of the buildings.

Indeed, much of this project’s success was our application of lessons learned from residential condo visualization to the commercial market, a sector of the real estate industry that is more accustomed to selling floor space using spreadsheets than concentrating on lifestyles. But the very nature of this project, one that focussed on how it would fit into the existing downtown Toronto urban fabric, called for an approach that didn’t treat people as mere occupants of cubicles: office workers value the whole experience of working in a vibrant, human-oriented environment, a viewpoint perhaps missed by traditional suburban office buildings.


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